Space For Rent

Space For Rent
Tuesday, October 27, 2015, Kartik 12, 1422 BS, Muharram 13, 1437 Hijri


King Salman's eight brothers want him out
Published :Tuesday, 27 October, 2015,  Time : 12:00 AM  View Count : 6

LONDON, Oct 26 : Eight of the 12 surviving sons of Saudi Arabia's founding monarch are supporting a move to oust King Salman, 79, the country's ailing ruler, and replace him with his 73-year-old brother, according to a dissident prince.
The prince also claims that a clear majority of the country's powerful Islamic clerics, known as the Ulama, would back a palace coup to oust the current King and install Prince Ahmed bin Abdulaziz, a former Interior Minister, in his place. "The Ulama and religious people prefer Prince Ahmed - not all of them, but 75 per cent," said the prince, himself a grandson of King Ibn Saud, who founded the ruling dynasty in 1932.
Support from the clerics would be vital for any change of monarch, since in the Saudi system only they have the power to confer religious and therefore political legitimacy on the leadership. The revelation suggests there is increasing pressure within the normally secretive Saudi royal family to bring to a head the internal power struggle that has erupted since King Salman inherited the throne at the beginning of this year. The prince, who cannot be named for security reasons, is the author of two recently published letters calling for the royal family to replace the current Saudi leadership.  In 1964 King Saud was finally deposed after a long power struggle, when the majority of senior royal family members and the Kingdom's religious establishment spoke with one voice and withdrew their support. The prince says something similar is going to happen again soon.
"Either the King will leave Saudi Arabia, like King Saud, and he will be very respected inside and outside the country," he told The Independent. "Alternatively Prince Ahmed will become Crown Prince, but with control of and responsibility for the whole country - the economy, oil, armed forces, national guard, interior ministry, secret  service, in fact everything from A to Z."
Unhappiness at King Salman's own diminishing faculties - he is reported to be suffering from Alzheimer's disease - has been compounded by his controversial appointments, the continuing and costly war in Yemen and the recent Hajj disaster. Earlier this week the International Monetary Fund warned that Saudi Arabia may run out of financial assets within five years unless the government sharply curbs its spending, because of a combination of low oil prices and the economic impact of regional wars.
The King's appointment of his favourite son, Mohammed bin Salman, 30, to the novel post of Deputy Crown Prince in April, and the decision to make him Defence Minister - enabling him to launch a proxy war in Yemen against the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels who forced the pro-Saudi former President to flee - have heightened tensions. He is said to have assumed too much power and wealth since being elevated to this position.     ?THE INDEPENDENT















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